The Mav

3 Things you might not have known about concussions

Even though most people realize the severity of concussions, most people don’t know the potential damage they can cause even after they are gone.

A+student+undergoes+a+physical+evaluation.
A student undergoes a physical evaluation.

A student undergoes a physical evaluation.

Marina Goter

Marina Goter

A student undergoes a physical evaluation.

Marina Goter, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Even though most people think they understand the damage a concussion can have on the brain, most people don’t understand how concussions affect people over the course of their life.

There are typically 1.6-3.8 million concussions a year.

An estimated 1.6-3.8 million sports- and recreation-related concussions occur in the United States each year. During 2001-2005, children and youth ages 5-18 years accounted for 2.4 million sports-related emergency department visits annually, of which 6% (135,000) involved a concussion. Concussions can happen with any kind of heavy or hard hit to the head. For some people, it is very easy to get a concussions, for others, it might only happen with a harder hit.

If it happens once, it will happen again.

Those who have gotten a concussion before are more susceptible to getting another. Just because you get a concussion doesn’t automatically mean you’re guaranteed to get another, but it is very likely your brain could get the same form of trauma again. Most people who have concussions recover fully within a couple weeks, but depending on the severity of the concussion, some people have permanent brain damage.

25% of concussions don’t get medical attention.

At least 25% of concussion sufferers fail to get assessed by medical personnel. Most people never even know that they have a concussion. Because mild concussions have little or no symptoms, people may not know they have a concussion. Others don’t have the money or resources to go to the doctor. For most individuals in this situation, their brain will recover on its own.

About the Contributor
Marina Goter, Reporter

Marina Goter is a sophomore. She enjoys dancing, listening to music, and hanging out with friends and family. She wants to be able to bring a fun, new voice to The Mav as well as inform students about events in and outside of the school.

You can contact her at [email protected]

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Fall

    The Sears brothers take on Mead’s Varsity Soccer

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Fall

    Cross Country faces challenges for a new generation of runners

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Fall

    Senior Easton Willyard encourages better performance through team building on the Varsity Football Team

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Fall

    Mead Varsity Softball shuts out Windsor opponents

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Fall

    Mead Varsity Football beats Lewis-Palmer Friday night

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Features

    Mead Varsity Baseball (Photo Gallery)

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    School

    Mead Varsity Baseball matches last season

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    News

    Mead has its first set of sisters playing on Varsity Soccer

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    Photo of the Week

    Girl’s Varsity Basketball beats Frederick in a tense game.

  • 3 Things you might not have known about concussions

    News

    Mead Wins Boys Varsity Basketball Game

The Student News Site of Mead High School
3 Things you might not have known about concussions