The Mav

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How Mead’s “Mav 30” compares to rival programs

A comparison of two high schools' advisory programs in order to see which is more effective.

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How Mead’s “Mav 30” compares to rival programs

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Last year at Mead High School, advisory was only once a week, and it was really stressful for faculty. It was disorganized, and teachers didn’t always know what they were going to do each week.  In order to solve these problems, advisory was made shorter and every day. This became known as Mav 30.

At Frederick High School, advisory has remained the same for several years.

While Frederick focuses on college readiness and school spirit in their advisory program one day per week for 45 minutes, Mav 30 has four repeating pillars every day of the week for 30 minutes.

The Dean of Students Mr. Gordon said, “It’s much more structured. It was one day a week so they didn’t know [what they] wanted to do each week.” He also said that an hour was too long for advisory, and putting it before lunch made it easy for students to skip class.

Lily Moon, a sophomore at Mead High School, stated, “I really enjoy our spirit days and our study halls, and some of the other things that we do aren’t as fun and kind of boring. We have social emotional days, study halls, and spirit days where we just play games.”

Lorelei Torres, a sophomore at Mead High School, also stated, “It gives me the chance to go and talk to teachers, but I dislike the social emotional days.”

Mead High School’s new advisory is clearly much more organized. Students at Frederick High School, however, are disinterested with the activities in their advisory.

Dylan Rangel, a sophomore at Frederick High School, stated, “All we do is really college based stuff, sometimes we will go with the other classes and have competitions.”

Lauren Speer, also a sophomore at Frederick,  stated “We get information about what is happening around the school. We also talk about good life skills, college, and what’s best for our future.”

Frederick’s advisory is 45 minutes long and once per week. It is mostly college based activities, talking about announcements, and unnecessary competitions with the rest of the school.

Mead’s advisory, in comparison, is different every day and only 30 minutes long. It’s much more organized and the activities are helpful and enjoyable.

About the Writer
Jazmine Spradling, Reporter

Jazmine is a sophomore. She likes babysitting and hanging out with friends and family. She wants to bring fun and spirit to The Mav.

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How Mead’s “Mav 30” compares to rival programs