The Lazy River

A poem by poet Brenna Cummiskey

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The Lazy River

Brenna Cummiskey, Poet

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Sometimes I feel as if I’m flowing back and forth, round and round in the same repetitive cycle of habits, the breaking of normalities and finding out more. But then sooner than later, I come to realize that none of those lessons previously brought to my attention really matter unless I incorporate them into my daily life and I commit myself to them.

If you want to find a way of eating that suits you and eat intuitively, then you must listen and take time out of every day to do just that.

If you want to exercise and feel better, then you have to tell yourself, I’m going to do this. If you want to quit an addictive habit, you need to be okay with the suffering and withdrawal that arrives in a suitcase full of knives and excruciating pain.  And you have to face the backlash almost everyday from holding yourself accountable.

This may sound self explanatory, but as I mentioned above, we all get stuck flowing round and round in this lazy river and it will take a long time for some to reach the exit where you drop off your tube and move onto the next ride. But the more you dedicate yourself wholeheartedly to completing the tasks that make you uncomfortable, the faster you will reach that exit and the bigger and the more thrilling ride will be there with an open seat. I’ve come to learn in my life that everyone and everything gets lost in this lazy river allusion. Our political atmosphere gets stuck quiet often because decisions remain stagnant while chaos and blaming remain prevalent. Apologies, Hugs, Letters, Homework, Taxes, Family…

These items, these relationships and these aspects of all of our lives hit a place where in your mind become glued to the endless continuum. And in our crazy diverse and composite mind, we physically cannot complete the action with full effort without going against ourselves.

We are the barriers that stop greatness.

Not your parents, not your instructors, professors, coaches.

Not your environment, not your race, ethnicity, or identification.

We have evolved into species that wants to constantly fulfill our own desires and anything that doesn’t satisfy that task suddenly becomes insignificant and we move onto the next quick fix. The next time you want to do something meaningful in your life and move forward, jumping onto the next biggest ride; try overpowering that part of your brain that is yelling in your ear, “Take the easy route.”