Students and staff react to switching Mav30 to Mav20 for the 2019-2020 school year

Opinions from students and teachers are mixed for Mav20

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Students and staff react to switching Mav30 to Mav20 for the 2019-2020 school year

Mrs. Warren has been teaching for 3 years. She currently teaches Social Studies, and she has taught English in the past.

Mrs. Warren has been teaching for 3 years. She currently teaches Social Studies, and she has taught English in the past.

Mrs. Warren has been teaching for 3 years. She currently teaches Social Studies, and she has taught English in the past.

Mrs. Warren has been teaching for 3 years. She currently teaches Social Studies, and she has taught English in the past.

Many students, as well as teachers, are split on the 10 minute time difference between Mav30 last year and Mav20 this year. 

Every day at 10:47, students attend a 20-minute advisory class before lunch. There are four different days set up for Mav20: Academic, Social-Emotional, College and Career Readiness, and School Culture. 

Mav20 is meant to be a safe place for students while also getting them out of their comfort zones. It is supposed to be an “opportunity to connect and find purpose,” according to Physical Education teacher Mrs. Abby Hicks.

As many know, Mav20 used to be 30 minutes. It was changed to 20 minutes after a schedule change was deemed necessary. Some teachers weren’t satisfied with the change.

“I liked the longer time with Mav20,” said social studies teacher Mrs. Erin Warren. 

In order to change the length of the advisory class, the whole schedule had to be changed.

“I really want to recognize the efforts that the planning team [made],” said Hicks.

Warren also said, “Helping to plan it made me see how much everyone, really, who’s on those committees wants it to go well… It’s improved every year.”

Some students have changes that they believe would better Mav20. “I wish it was maybe a little longer but for one day a week,” said Ruby Hendrix-Johnson (‘21).

Haley Price (‘22) also said, “Sometimes, I feel like we don’t have enough School Culture days.” 

However, some teachers are not teaching the class at all.

“We’re not consistent across the board,” said Warren.

Because some classes seem to differ from others, students do notice discrepancies. For example, not every Mav20 class shows MavTV (the bi-weekly student broadcast) consistently. 

Tommy Tathum (’22) said that his teacher sometimes plays the broadcast while other times doesn’t.

There are Gifted Mav20 classes as well. Audrey Long (’22) said that, because their class is for gifted students, they sometimes need to accomplish different things.

Warren added that “If other teachers saw how invested the committees were, they would try a little harder” when referring to the amount of work some teachers have put into designing Mav20.