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The Mav

Mead High School’s Student News

The Mav

Mead High School’s Student News

The Mav

Dance age restrictions should be expanded to 20 years old (Editorial)

Though appreciated, newly expanded age restrictions still don’t take into consideration a section of student body
A+corsage+is+a+small+bouquet+worn+on+a+lady%E2%80%99s+wrist+or+dress.
Skylar Whalen
A corsage is a small bouquet worn on a lady’s wrist or dress.

School dances have become an integral part of attending high school in today’s American society. It’s a time to get all dressed up, have fun with friends, and, for some, go on a date. 

With this in mind, Mead High School is missing an important aspect to school dances. Students have very limited restrictions on the age of guests they can bring. Homecoming is meant to invite the community back to the school, and prom is geared towards the upperclassmen of the school. 

Though a new school rule has expanded age restrictions to alumni of the former graduation year, most of whom would be about 19, this still doesn’t provide the realistic opportunity of bringing a date from one’s personal community.

Logically speaking, if a freshman or even a sophomore were to start dating a senior, that senior will have graduated by the time that freshman or sophomore gets a chance to go to their senior prom. Whereas, a freshman or sophomore not dating an upperclassman has the opportunity to go to dances with that student.

This is not an uncommon age difference in the US. The average age gap between American couples is about two to three years.

Regardless of views on when it is suitable to date, this predicament is unfair to students and their experience in high school. It favors one portion of students over the other. 

We understand safety is a priority, particularly for dances. With that, we’re not saying someone can bring a 50 year old to homecoming. That is ridiculous; however, with all of these points in perspective, we are asking for the age restriction to be expanded to 20 years old.

An old photo of the Mead High School Dance Contract 2019-2020 is located in a 2019 Mav Newspaper article, “Changes regarding the 2019-2020 homecoming dance contract explained.” (Shelby Lewis)

In a dance contract from 2019 to 2020, the rules looked very similar to what we are asking for now: “Guests may not be over the age of 20 and no middle school [students].”

It is understandable that teenagers’ brains and maturity are still developing, and the school dance atmosphere for the rest of the student body may be affected if someone older is present.

In expanding the age back to 20, much of the dilemma of a junior or senior not being able to bring their date is solved. Concerns about safety can also be solved, for guns and alcohol cannot be legally bought by a 20 year old, therefore decreasing the risk. 

If the school is concerned about authority over graduated guests, waivers or contracts relinquishing one’s own authority to admin can be signed before entering the dance.

Expanding the age restriction to recently graduated alumni is an exciting step for us as students. We appreciate the expanded freedom that our school has granted us; however, we ask that Mead High School will take another baby-step to expanding the dance age restriction to 20 years old. 

The original purpose of these dances was to bring people together. We can further that tradition by expanding the age restriction.

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About the Contributors
Shelby Lewis, Copy and Design Editor
Shelby enjoys reading, writing, and spending time with her friends and family. You can contact her at [email protected]
Skylar Whalen, Editor-in-Chief

Skylar Whalen is a senior. She is this year's editor-in-chief. Skylar enjoys painting, singing, and playing softball. She is a huge animal lover and works with dogs outside of school. Skylar plays competitive softball and hopes to play in college. She is excited to help other writers succeed and grow. Skylar can’t wait to work with new people and produce engaging stories for the community around her. She also enjoys having the excuse to write about herself in third person and make her seem interesting.

   
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